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TMT: Choosing the Right Energy Product

Video Transcript

Let’s discuss risk. If we were having this webinar three months ago, we would be talking a lot about the cost savings versus your prior contract and how we hit some of the lowest prices in the last 20 years in February, which was just unheard of.

It would have been a very different conversation from today where we want to focus on cost aversion — avoiding any risk in the future given all the factors that we’re aware of today. Where we anticipate using those factors, where we anticipate energy prices to go, and what that means for you and your energy costs.

The biggest way to do this is through product selection. When a supplier uses “product” terminology, they’re basically meaning of all the moving components of your electricity or natural gas costs, how are you fixing those and what is the variability going to be from those month-to-month on your invoice?

Low Risk Tolerance Customers

So when we look at this meter, you see in that bluish-white area is for low risk-tolerance customers. You need a lot of budget certainty, you can’t have a lot of variation in the rate month-to-month, and you need to plan in advance for what’s coming down the pike. This would be more of a fixed product, or a fixed all-in. You’re taking all of the different components of your energy cost and locking them as much as possible.

When done correctly, you should in theory have the same per-kWh or per-therm cost on your invoice every month.

High Risk Tolerance Customers

If you go to the other side of the meter, you have the index or variable or floating type of products. These ride the roller coaster of the energy market. So you’re going to have a lot of variability.

There’s been some advantages to this certainly in the past year or two where prices have continued to come down continuously, so if you’ve been riding an index product you may have seen some of those record-low prices and been able to take advantage of that.

But on the flip side, now we’re facing volatility. And volatility, again, means a roller coaster. So if you have a little more bandwidth to have a higher risk tolerance, then this may be the kind of product for you.

Product type is going to look different for every organization. We’ve already seen where COVID-19 has affected every business (even within the same industry) very differently, and going forward a recession could affect every organization differently. So I would stress that you should really look at your internal risk tolerance — not only what it was in the past but also what it’s going to be going forward with all of the unknowns.

Current Energy Product Trends

A trend that we’re seeing right now is even some of our long-term clients that have always been on some type of float or index product are actually looking to fix as much as they possibly can. There’s a lot of uncertainty still up in the air. We don’t know a lot of things that are going to shake out from COVID and the recession and these other factors we’ve described.

So to be able to have control over a certain portion of your budget via energy, we’re seeing where people are starting to switch more to the fixed and low-risk types of products.

 

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TMT: Energy Challenges for Manufacturers

Video Transcript

Hi everyone, and welcome back to another Nania Energy Advisors’ Two-Minute Tuesday. I’m AJ Brockman, Nania’s Content Marketing Manager. Today we will be talking with Senior Energy Advisor and Mid-Atlantic Manager Mike Eckenroth about the specific challenges that manufacturers face when it comes to energy. So let’s get started!

Energy Challenges for Manufacturers

AJ: So Mike, when it comes to energy, what would you say are the top two to three challenges manufacturers typically face?

Mike E: Good question! I would say number one is probably how to reduce and control energy costs.

Manufacturing is typically an energy-intensive process. You’re taking a number of raw materials, putting them through your process, and converting them into what you want to make. And throughout that process, there’s a lot of energy consumed. So the concern is about how to reduce and control those costs to keep operational costs low.

Secondly, manufacturers want efficiency and confidence in their energy procurement, which isn’t always easy to have. There’s a lot of different choices available — brokers, advisors, consultants, suppliers and products — to choose from. Figuring out a process to determine which method to use for procurement is definitely a challenge.

Tips for Reducing Costs

AJ: And when you talk to manufacturers or decision makers in manufacturing, what sorts of tips or solutions to those challenges are they typically looking for?

ME: So to answer the second point, we did a broker versus advisor video a few months ago, so I recommend they check that out. But, really, it’s about finding an advisor or consultant that you trust and that sits on your side of the table.

You want them negotiating with suppliers on your behalf to achieve your goals. So you should feel that all of those things are being met by them, and I’d recommend interviewing a few different ones to get a feel of who has your best interests in mind and who you have the most confidence in.

Secondly, they’re looking to identify opportunities that they might not have seen otherwise. The number one way to do this is with an energy audit.

You have various operations that you’re doing day in and day out, and you might not realize there are opportunities in front of you for that. This could be things like LEDs or HVAC controls, variable frequency drives, water controls. An energy audit will identify those opportunities, and then we can prioritize those according to your ROI goals. So this is really about making you more efficient, doing more of the same output with less energy input, reducing those costs from that side.

Along that same vein is demand response. Demand response is a voluntary curtailment program during emergencies. So for a few hours of participation a year, a manufacturer could earn tens of thousands of dollars in payment for those.

This is particularly important for manufacturers because they usually have some control over when their energy is being consumed. They can schedule activities at different times and things like that, and so it’s typically a program that works really well for them.

And lastly is tax exemptions. This has been huge for manufacturers that we work with. Nania Energy is not a tax firm, we are not licensed tax professionals that can provide advice on taxes.

However, we’re aware of some exemptions that exist, and we can double check your bills for those. So if you are paying taxes and you shouldn’t be, that’s something we’ll be able to take a look at and either recommend you to one of our partnered tax firms or have you investigate it and recover that money (up to 48 months in some states) as well as remove that cost going forward. So that’s really low-hanging fruit that’s available for manufacturers.

Sustainable Manufacturing

AJ: Great tips, Mike. Lastly, I want to talk about green energy. Sustainability is starting to become more of a factor for both producers and consumers. What advice would you give to manufacturers who are interested in going green?

ME: So what we talked about with energy audits: even though it may or may not seem like that’s the easiest way to go green, it probably is one of the easiest. There’s a lot of wasted energy in a lot of different processes that manufacturers use, and there are ways to recover that. There are ROIs that are increasingly lower and lower to match those 2 and 3 year goals that some organizations have for that. So that would be number one: looking for those efficiency opportunities.

Number two is sourcing your energy with green power. Typically, energy supply agreements are going to be maybe 10 percent renewable, depending on your state or municipality. And there are opportunities for you to source 100 percent of your energy from renewable sources.

You do pay a little bit of a premium for it, but you’re talking about one to two percent, so it’s very manageable if green energy is a corporate initiative or an initiative for your organization. That’s definitely a way to achieve that.

And thirdly is on-site generation. This is typically a little less popular, mostly because you have to have the floor space or the space to dedicate to it. There are requirements, such as how long you’re going to be in the building, lease obligations, and ROI constraints that you have to sort through.

On-site generation is going to have longer ROI, but if you have the square footage or roof space to allocate to solar and you have a longer term that you’re willing to accept the ROI for, that’s absolutely something you should be looking into and could provide some of the results you’re looking for.

 

AJ: Great! Well thanks so much, Mike, for all of that great information. And thank you to everyone for watching our video! If you’re in manufacturing or you’re a decision maker for a manufacturing facility, tune in to our webinar on June 25th. We will be presenting some energy tips that are specific to you.

Thanks again for watching! If you found this video helpful, please like, comment, or share below.

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Pass-Through Product: An Alternative to Fixed All-In

Video Transcript

Hi everyone! I’m AJ Brockman, Nania Energy Advisors’s Content Marketing Manager. For today’s Two-Minute Tuesday, I’m going to be talking with Senior Energy Advisor Calvin Cornish.

With the effects of COVID-19 and everything else that’s going on right now, suppliers are starting to offer the Fixed All-In product less frequently. And so today, Calvin and I are going to talk about a product that is a good alternative to Fixed All-In.

What is a Pass-Through Cap & Trans Product?

AJ: So Calvin, what exactly is a pass-through cap and trans product and how is that different from fixed all-in?

Calvin: With a fixed all-in product, you have one set rate for all of your energy components. Your total energy supply cost is actually made up of several different components besides just the physical energy itself. The energy makes up about 60 percent of that total cost.

When you start to break those pieces apart, you take capacity and transmission (which are demand-based charges) and pass those through at their actual realized cost.

What are Capacity and Transmission?

AJ: Can you go into a little more detail about what capacity and transmission are?

Calvin: Absolutely. So capacity and transmission are dollars that are collected to incentivize the generation of electricity and taking care of the network. They are demand-based charges, which basically means that they’re based on your peak load usage over time as opposed to how much you use every day. So think of $10 per day as opposed to $.02 per kWh.

How Risky is a Pass-Through Product?

AJ: From a risk perspective, obviously with Fixed All-In and having all your components under one rate offering the most budget stability, where on that risk spectrum does a pass-through product fall?

Calvin: Well, when you’re passing through just capacity and transmission, it’s only slightly more risk than a fixed all-in product because those charges, as we mentioned, are flat dollar per day charges. They don’t change frequently, so we’re able to predict them with a lot of accuracy for the upcoming year. They change on an annual basis than, for example, energy supply which changes on an hourly basis.

AJ: So it still gives you that budget stability that you’re looking for without having your demand charges as part of your fixed rate.

Calvin: Yes, and in some cases it’s almost more budget stability because when you lock them in as part of the all-in rate, then your entire cost is affected by your usage. So you can’t control them.

When you pull out capacity and transmission, they’re no longer factors of your usage. And so those costs are actually going to be more dead-on with the predicted calculation.

What are the Benefits of a Pass-Through Product?

AJ: So besides budget stability, how does a pass-through cap and trans product benefit the clients who choose to use it?

Calvin: Well one of the benefits of passing through those demand-based charges is that they potentially can go down over time. If you improve your efficiency by doing a lighting project or some other way that reduces your peak load, then in the following year you’ll see a lower peak load factor. That factor is what is multiplied by your capacity rate. So you can reduce those costs over time by improving your efficiency.

What are the Drawbacks?

AJ: Are there any drawbacks to this product type?

Calvin: Well, the flip side of that coin is if your efficiency were to decrease over time. There is the potential for your capacity rate to go up. And as we mentioned, rates are fluctuating less for capacity and transmission, but they do change on an annual basis. So there’s a different rate each year.

Historically, especially in the ComEd market for example, those rates are known up to 3 years in advance, so we do still have a lot of stability there. But that is something that can change over time, so you could possibly see a different rate every year.

Who’s a Good Fit for a Pass-Through Product?

AJ: Finally, is there any customer type that you would recommend a pass-through cap and trans product to more over another type?

Calvin: I’d have to say that customers with a very predictable load, like a residential building or an office building, are good clients to pass those charges through. Additionally, clients looking for a high level of budget stability like schools who want their costs to not fluctuate as much as possible and be able to predict those costs. I think those are the best clients for this product.

A manufacturing facility or someone that has a lot of variation in their usage may have changing peak loads and may require a little more attention. They may actually want to pass through even more components to give themselves more flexibility to match up with their needs.

 

AJ: Gotcha. Well thank you very much, Calvin, for all of the great information! And thank you to all of you for tuning in to our Two-Minute Tuesday today. If you have any questions about pass-through products or any other product types, feel free to reach out to us and let us know. And if you found this video helpful, please like, comment, or share below.

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TMT: Energy Tips for Facilities and Operations Managers

Video Transcript

If you’re a facilities manager, Director of Operations, or COO, you deal with almost everything happening at your facility on a daily basis. And if you oversee more than one facility, your tasks and responsibilities are even greater.

In this week’s Two-Minute Tuesday, we’re going to dive into energy concerns specific to you and share some energy tips for facilities and operations managers that make the process easier for you.

Concern #1: Ease of Procurement Process

One of your concerns is that you need the procurement process to be as easy as possible.

With all you have going on, you don’t have time to sift through mounds of paperwork or charts or spend hours considering every option.

To make the process easier on yourself, consider working with an energy broker or an energy advisor.

They’ll do the heavy lifting for you — requesting pricing, communicating with suppliers, and comparing supplier offerings. Based on their findings, they’ll give you a proposal that clearly states their recommendation based on your facility’s needs.

Concern #2: Efficiency

You also want your facility to be operating as efficiently as possible to reduce your bottom line. Old or outdated machinery could be using more energy than necessary and causing you to be over budget.

To combat this, have an audit performed on your facility to identify possible inefficiencies. The audit will identify both immediate and long-term opportunities for you to lower your energy usage.

And as an added bonus, many utilities currently offer efficiency incentives, reducing your overall project cost.

Concern #3: Budget Adherence and Risk Avoidance

Another important aspect of your job is making sure you’re adhering to your budget.

Can you explain to your CFO why your projected energy costs were ten percent over budget? Are you sure it was due to increased production? What if it was something else?

Taking unnecessary risks with your energy can easily blow up your budget, and you don’t have time to examine the details of every available energy product.

An energy advisor or broker is well-versed in supplier product options and can help you select the one that makes the most sense for your facility. This should be based on your production schedule, sustainability requirements, and any upcoming energy efficiency projects.

Concern #4: Looking for Competitive Advantages

Lastly, you’re looking for ways to give your facility a competitive advantage.

In addition to a strong procurement strategy and doing efficiency projects, consider enrolling in a Demand Response program.

Facilities that choose to participate earn money for voluntarily reducing their usage during test events and peak usage times. The more you can curtail, the higher your payout, and the more funds you have at your disposal for site upgrades.

 

As a facilities or operations manager, you deal with so many variables every day. Your energy consumption and spend is an important aspect of this, but it doesn’t have to be overwhelming.

Keep these energy tips for facilities in mind when looking at your next project or agreement.

Thank you for watching! If you found this video helpful, please feel free to share it with other operations folks, then like or comment below.

TMT: Energy Management Tips for Property Managers

When it comes to managing energy costs, property managers face a number of unique concerns.

It’s not just you making a decision — you have to help your board make a decision and, ideally, make the best one.

You’re worried about:

  • Budget certainty
  • Getting competitive pricing
  • Showing you did your due diligence
  • Saving money
  • Proving that you saved money
  • And did I mention getting consensus from a whole group?

You can’t tackle all of those at once, but we do have some advice on how to address some of these concerns. In this week’s Two-Minute Tuesday, we’re sharing some energy management tips for property managers.

Energy Concern 1: Staying within your budget

One area you’re concerned with is making sure you stay on track with your energy budget.

To achieve budget stability over time, it’s important to stay at least a season ahead of your contract end dates. A good rule of thumb is to test the market 12 months in advance and be prepared to take action in that 9-12 month time frame.

There’s no secret sauce for timing the market. However, following this time frame will allow you the flexibility to avoid rate spikes and take some of the speculation out of the market.

Energy Concern 2: Getting a competitive rate

You’re also looking for competitive rates to save your board the most money.

For larger buildings, a reverse auction is a great option for maximizing transparency and supplier competition. The end result is the lowest possible price on a given day and a very clear documentation to provide the board with confidence in their decision.

For mid-size buildings, you can create similar results with a multi-step bidding process.

Energy Concern 3: Managing board expectations

Lastly, you want to manage your board’s expectations regarding savings potential.

When you’re working with efficiency projects big or small, managing board expectations is critical.

So often I’ve heard about boards who are dissatisfied with a project that is saving them lots of money because it isn’t as much as the sales guy said it would be.

Providing independent savings projections and establishing key performance indicators up front will go a long way to providing your board with the confidence necessary to move forward. It will also make verification of project success much easier.

Keep these energy management tips in mind.

As a property manager, you have a lot on your plate. But keeping these energy tips specific to property managers in mind will make this part of your job easier and keep you looking good to your board.

Thanks for watching! If you found this video helpful, send it to a fellow property manager, then like or comment below.

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TMT: Benefits of a Reverse Auction

Video Transcript

What’s the difference in electricity and natural gas supplied to you between one supplier or another?

The answer? None. They’re both commodities. There’s absolutely no qualitative difference if your supplier is Constellation, Direct Energy, or any of the other dozens of retail energy suppliers.

So, what does matter? Making sure that you’re getting the best effort from all qualified suppliers to provide your organization with the best results.

In this week’s Two-Minute Tuesday, we’re going to talk about how a reverse auction for energy procurement can compress supplier margin and drive energy savings for you.

How does a reverse auction work?

In a reverse auction, all qualified energy suppliers are invited to compete against each other in a live event that you can watch through an online portal.

With each bid, suppliers attempt to win your business by under-bidding one another. They can’t see who the lowest supplier is, but they can see the price to beat. This gives each supplier “last look” and dramatically improves the level of competition.

What happens when the auction ends?

At the conclusion of the auction, when no supplier is willing to go any lower, you’re left with the supplier who was willing to put their money where their mouth is. And the lowest possible energy rates achievable.

You’ll also have a report with time and date stamped bids from all suppliers during the auction.

Consider using a reverse auction for your procurement.

For commodity procurement, there is no more efficient and transparent platform than the reverse auction. But it’s important to note that the auction is just one tool in your energy management toolbox. You aren’t guaranteed the best results just by virtue of using one.

Your consultant or broker should also be:

  • Helping you develop an RFP that defines your energy goals and assists you in making the best decision
  • Monitoring the market for you to advise on the timing of your purchase, and
  • Partnering with you directly to meet the reporting needs of your organization.

When you’re considering options for your upcoming commodity agreement, check out a reverse auction. It might provide some valuable competition you might be missing from your process.

Thanks for watching! If you found this video helpful, please like, comment, or share below.

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Run an Effective Energy RFP – Energy ABC’s #3

Video Transcript

Figuring out when to buy energy and what to include in your energy RFP can mean the difference between an operating budget bust or surplus for your District.

Get your notes ready! Because I’m about to rapid-fire some best practices for running an effective energy RFP for your district.

Give yourself plenty of time.

Let’s say you get yet another call from an energy provider asking you about your gas and electric contracts. You spout off your standard answer of “We’re locked in for another three years, so we’re all good” and hang up the phone.

While you’re not interested in taking a sales call, it does jog your memory that you haven’t looked at your actual contracts in quite a while. So you track them down and see that you’re up in the next 12 months. So now what?

I’ll give you a hint: the answer is not file it away in a cabinet until a month before your contract expires.

Give yourself ample time to review this process. Engage with new providers. Watch the market. And get buy-in from any necessary parties, such as your Board.

By giving yourself plenty of runway, you could save thousands of dollars and add to your bottom line.

Know your contract end date.

Because all energy supply contracts are purchased on the futures market, they’re all technically forward-facing agreements. So, you can go to market at any time during your current agreement for your renewal.

Let’s say, for example, you have a December end date on your current agreement. You can go out to RFP in January, if you’d like. And you would set a parameter for a December start date. Suppliers can start the new contract whenever you’d like.

How this would work is your new contract would bookend to your current agreement. Just make sure you have accuracy in what your current contract end date is. What you don’t want to happen is to have an overlap of two supply agreements or have a gap in service — both which can result in large penalties to your District.

Watch the market.

So is there a better time of year to buy than others?

Not really.

In theory, it makes sense that you would buy in the off-peak seasons — so you would buy gas when it’s warm outside and buy electricity when it’s cool outside.

But anymore, the market’s not really weather-driven because we’re at a surplus of natural gas domestically. You want to pay more attention to geopolitical speculations and financial gains of any traders, and that’s really what’s going to affect the market.

If you’re trying to “time the market,” you’re better off to give yourself enough runway to watch the market for opportunities. And if you don’t have the time to do that, align yourself with a partner who will and will notify you of any substantial changes.

Consider competitive bidding.

Which brings me to my final point. Call your peers and ask for referrals of any energy partners they utilize. Then pick their brains on RFP parameters that they have.

Keep in mind any changes you have upcoming, such as a closing building or solar installation. These partners should be able to help you build out an effective energy RFP to run on your own, or maybe you trust them enough to run it for you.

Also, keep in mind that energy procurement in public schools does not require a formal bidding process per school code. So, you’re able to work and align with partners that you trust and value.

However, competitive bidding is always a great option, whether you do a traditional sealed bid or maybe you utilized a more tech-advanced option, such as a reverse auction software. Competitive bidding where multiple suppliers compete against each other can really drive down your overall cost.

Build your own effective energy RFP.

Now that you have a jumping-off point, pull out those dusty old contracts and see when they end. If it’s in the next 12-18 months, now is the perfect time to start gathering information and engage with new partners.

Thanks for watching! Check us out in our next video in the series Energy ABC’s.

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TMT: Demand Response Program for Schools

Video Transcript

Starting June 1st of 2020, significant changes to the Demand Response program in our region could mean a drastic reduction in your school’s payout.

In this week’s Two-Minute Tuesday, we’ll talk about these changes and what they mean for your school district.

What is Demand Response?

Let’s start with a quick recap of Demand Response.

On days when our power demand is at its highest, relative to the “capacity” available to handle that demand, our grid — also known as PJM — has to ensure that everyone who needs power has it. This prevents blackouts.

Rather than installing expensive infrastructure that may only be used a few hours a year to meet that high demand, PJM started a program known as Demand Response.

In the Demand Response program, participants can voluntarily commit to reducing their power load during times that require it.

The only caveat is that participants have to prove that they can hit those levels during an annual 1-hour test event. In return, those participants receive money from PJM for both the test event and any emergency events, should they occur.

What’s new this year?

Historically, these real emergency events only posed a threat in the summer on the hottest days of the year.

Given recent history, however, the winter now also poses a threat in bouts of extremely low temperatures. So how has the Demand Response program changed?

Well, starting June 1st of 2020, the program will require year-round enrollments versus summer only of previous programs. Your total curtailment amount as a school district is now based off the lower of your two PLCs — both winter and summer.

Unless you use electric heat, this means your total curtailment is likely going to decrease dramatically — and so is your money earning potential.

Some curtailment service providers have adapted their software to accommodate these changes and may be able to offer you a unique solution to still enroll for summer only. But keep in mind: your total payout will likely be half of what it was in the past.

Ask your provider how this will impact you.

If your current provider has not yet contacted you about these changes, reach out and ask them how it’s going to impact your revenue potential.

And, if you have questions about how you can still capture some of the earnings — versus dropping out of the program altogether — reach out to us. We’re happy to help!

Thanks so much for watching. If you found this video helpful, please like, comment, or share below.

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3 Ways to Purchase Energy – Energy ABC’s #2

Video Transcript

Hey guys! It’s Becky with Nania Energy, back with the second video in our series “Energy ABC’s.”

Today we’re going to cover a heavy topic of the different ways to purchase energy.

There’s a lot of different options available to you: there’s consortiums, using a broker or consultant, or going direct through a supplier. We’ll cover the pros and cons of each so that you can figure out which is best for your district.

Option 1: Consortiums

Alright, so let’s start with consortiums — or, buying groups or co-ops.

These are typically large groups of similarly-structured businesses, like a K-12 school, that band together to purchase energy in bulk.

A lot of these were created over a decade ago when electricity was first deregulated in Illinois and there was a lot of volatility in the market. So they banded together for safety in numbers.

Consortium — Pros

Think of it like a glacier — it’s large and slow moving, but doesn’t veer much off course. That’s the way that consortiums typically purchase energy, which is great for you as a school district because it’s little to no maintenance.

Consortiums are typically governed by an appointed board, and they oversee a third party — such as a consultant or a supplier — that makes a purchasing decision on your behalf. So it’s kind of a set it and forget it option for your school district. This is really great for you if you’re a smaller school and energy isn’t a large portion of your budget, and you just don’t have the time to dedicate to it.

Consortium — Cons

Some of the disadvantages that come with this, however, is that they’re not a low-cost provider. They don’t set out to be. They’re trying to flat-line the price and eliminate any of the big highs and lows that may exist.

So any opportunities that pop up like we saw in summer 2019 — when we had the lowest prices in the last decade — you’re not able to take advantage of, and you’re limited in the flexibility that you have to look outside of the buying group itself.

A lot of times, to even exit the group once you’re a member could take 3 or 4 years. So you have to be pretty committed to the process if you’re going to join.

 Option 2: Advisor, Broker, or Consultant

The second option you have to purchase energy is to use an ABC — an Advisor, Broker, or Consultant.

While there’s differences between those three, one similarity is that they’re all a third-party that acts as a middleman between your district and your supplier.

ABC — Pros

They often have several supplier relationships, so when they run an RFP for you they’re able to bring a large level of competition — which translates into a lower rate for your school.

They also can offer a range of services to help make your life easier and save you time and energy. This includes:

  • Bill auditing services
  • Handling customer service issues you have with the utility
  • Helping you forecast your forward fiscal budget
  • Validating any ROIs you have on efficiency projects.

ABC — Cons

Some disadvantages to using an ABC, however, is that there is an additional cost. You do pay them a fee, and you should know what that fee is to know that it’s fair and reasonable for your district.

Each ABC handles this a little bit differently. Some require an up-front consulting fee, some bill you directly monthly, and others will actually bake their fee into your fixed rate on your supplier bill.

Make sure you have the conversation ahead of time and know what this is. If your current ABC isn’t willing to share this information with you, it’s generally a red flag that something’s probably not right.

Another drawback of using an ABC is that there are unfortunately low barriers to entry in our state. There’s literally hundreds of brokers in the state of Illinois.

Make sure that you do your due diligence and ask them for references of other K-12’s they’re working with. Check up on them and make sure that they have a full understanding of how your school business operates. It’ll be most important to your bottom line.

Option 3: Directly through a supplier

A third option you have is to work directly through a supplier. These are the people you receive your invoice from each month.

Direct through Supplier — Pros

By working directly through a supplier, there’s no third-party administration cost like there is with using a consortium or a broker.

They also may be able to offer you some completely customized products that you’re not able to get by running a standardized RFP.

Direct through Supplier — Cons

However, this option is really best for districts that have the time and energy that it takes to understand the energy world and make sure they’re not putting their school at risk.

 

There’s a lot of moving pieces to energy, and having a partner to help guide you through that process is imperative to ensure you’re making the best decision for you and your school business.

I hope you enjoyed this video and found it helpful in determining which method you’ll use going forward. If you have any questions, drop us a line or shoot us a note — we’d be happy to help.

Otherwise, we’ll see you next time on Energy ABC’s!

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Energy Buying for Schools – Energy ABC’s #1

Video Transcript

Hi guys! I’m Becky with Nania Energy.

When I talk to school business officials about purchasing gas and electric, I’m often given a lot of questions about how the process works, and there’s a lack of clarity and a lot of misunderstanding around it all.

So I had this idea to release this mini-vlog series called “Energy ABC’s” where we’re going to really hone in on the biggest obstacles that school districts face and give you tangible ways to overcome them.

Right now, we’re going to swap seats. I’m going to act as the school business official and go through some of the biggest obstacles that our clients have told us they face.

Obstacle 1

Energy is so complex. There’s so many layers.

You don’t even know which way to purchase — do you use a consortium? Or do you go directly through a supplier like Constellation?

You’re getting 22 calls a day from different providers saying they can offer you a better rate and more savings.

But how do you know who to trust?

Obstacle 2

You also have a lot of customers that you have to appease in your position. You have school board members, you have other administrators, you have the community. So any decisions you make for change you have to take very heavily and very seriously. And you have to make sure all the boxes are checked.

You also are managing a lot of aspects of school business from teacher contracts to lunch programs to maybe even transportation. You don’t have the time to dedicate to energy, and you’re not an expert in that field.

So how do you know what the right choice is to make? And how do you know what the opportunity cost is by waiting until your contract expires versus looking at it sooner?

Obstacle 3

And finally: how do you make your district more green? How do you become more sustainable and keep up with the Joneses, so to speak?

You’re being asked to bring in more green initiatives to your district while simultaneously being asked to cut your budget and reduce your spending. How is that supposed to work?

Learn how to make energy work for your district.

So, over the next couple of weeks we’ll release some videos that really show you how to address these concerns and make them work for your school district. If there’s something that we haven’t talked about today, shoot me a line or drop us a note and let us know of something you’d like us to discuss.

Otherwise, we’ll see you next time on Energy ABC’s where we’ll dive into the 3 main ways that schools purchase energy. Thank you!

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