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TMT: Is Now a Good Time to Buy Energy?

Video Transcript

Hello everyone! Welcome back to another Nania Energy Advisors’ Two-Minute Tuesday. I’m AJ Brockman, Nania Energy’s Content Marketing Manager. And today we will be talking with Senior Energy Advisor Mike Zaura.

We’ve seen a lot more market volatility recently, which has led to some clients asking us, “Is now still a good time to buy?” And that’s what Mike and I will be talking about in today’s video.

Recent Market Movement

AJ: So Mike, most states started putting COVID-19 measures in place in early March. What have the energy markets looked like in these past two months?

MZ: Thank you, AJ, for the question. Yes most states started those in early March, but we started seeing energy markets go down as early as the end of February. And as the chart shows here, you can see the steady decline.

Source: ino.com, New York Mercantile Exchange Natural Gas 3 month history

So that coincided with equity markets. As we all know, stocks went down quite a bit and everybody felt the pains of watching that happen.

But energy markets went down quite a bit as well. Now, while stocks and equity markets have recovered, the energy markets have not. They’ve recovered a little bit, but a lot slower than the equity markets.

So, while the energy markets are still down, there’s a lot of volatility still out there right now. A good example of this is what happened a couple Mondays ago. There was a pipeline explosion in Kentucky, and overnight and going into Tuesday morning gas markets spiked about 8.5 percent.

Now that’s volatility that’s not COVID-related, but it gives you an idea of some of the spikes that can occur and how the market recovers after that.

Is Now a Good Time to Buy Energy?

AJ: Okay Mike, let’s answer the question that’s on everybody’s mind. Is now a good time to buy?

MZ: An excellent question, and yes it is a good time to buy.  But, more importantly, it’s a better time to explore your options. A lot of the questions we’ve been getting recently are “With all the volatility going on, should I even think about buying? Should I wait? What should we do?”

If you explore your options, that’s one of the best things you can do right now. This puts you in a position to at least see what’s out there — you can see what rates and term options are available to you. Regardless of when your agreement is up, whether it’s a few months from now or the end of 2021, exploring your options now gives you ability to make a good decision on whether to buy now or wait.

What Do You Recommend?

AJ: What would you recommend to your clients today?

MZ: Exactly what I touched upon a little bit earlier: explore your options. In addition to looking at what’s available now, it also sets you up if you do decide to wait. If you’re willing to wait and are a little less risk adverse, then you are set up to take advantage of a little volatility in the market.

To give you an example, say the market goes down 3-5 percent on a given day. If you did explore your options, you’re already set up with suppliers with your account information and they have everything they’re looking for. If the market goes down, you can easily jump on an opportunity to grab those savings. You wouldn’t be able to do that if you weren’t set up earlier than that.

So exploring your options is the best recommendation. Maybe you’d see 10-15 percent savings right now, maybe 20 percent savings. What kind of impact could that have on you and your bottom line during these times? So you can act now by exploring. If you like what you see, great. If you have a little more time to wait on your agreement, that’s even better. You can take on a little more risk if you have the appetite for it and then jump on the market opportunity when it presents itself. Those would be my recommendations right now.

AJ: Well thank you so much, Mike, for all of that awesome information. And thank you to you all for watching! If you found this video helpful, please like, comment, or share below, and be on the lookout for next week’s Two-Minute Tuesday video.

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Pass-Through Product: An Alternative to Fixed All-In

Video Transcript

Hi everyone! I’m AJ Brockman, Nania Energy Advisors’s Content Marketing Manager. For today’s Two-Minute Tuesday, I’m going to be talking with Senior Energy Advisor Calvin Cornish.

With the effects of COVID-19 and everything else that’s going on right now, suppliers are starting to offer the Fixed All-In product less frequently. And so today, Calvin and I are going to talk about a product that is a good alternative to Fixed All-In.

What is a Pass-Through Cap & Trans Product?

AJ: So Calvin, what exactly is a pass-through cap and trans product and how is that different from fixed all-in?

Calvin: With a fixed all-in product, you have one set rate for all of your energy components. Your total energy supply cost is actually made up of several different components besides just the physical energy itself. The energy makes up about 60 percent of that total cost.

When you start to break those pieces apart, you take capacity and transmission (which are demand-based charges) and pass those through at their actual realized cost.

What are Capacity and Transmission?

AJ: Can you go into a little more detail about what capacity and transmission are?

Calvin: Absolutely. So capacity and transmission are dollars that are collected to incentivize the generation of electricity and taking care of the network. They are demand-based charges, which basically means that they’re based on your peak load usage over time as opposed to how much you use every day. So think of $10 per day as opposed to $.02 per kWh.

How Risky is a Pass-Through Product?

AJ: From a risk perspective, obviously with Fixed All-In and having all your components under one rate offering the most budget stability, where on that risk spectrum does a pass-through product fall?

Calvin: Well, when you’re passing through just capacity and transmission, it’s only slightly more risk than a fixed all-in product because those charges, as we mentioned, are flat dollar per day charges. They don’t change frequently, so we’re able to predict them with a lot of accuracy for the upcoming year. They change on an annual basis than, for example, energy supply which changes on an hourly basis.

AJ: So it still gives you that budget stability that you’re looking for without having your demand charges as part of your fixed rate.

Calvin: Yes, and in some cases it’s almost more budget stability because when you lock them in as part of the all-in rate, then your entire cost is affected by your usage. So you can’t control them.

When you pull out capacity and transmission, they’re no longer factors of your usage. And so those costs are actually going to be more dead-on with the predicted calculation.

What are the Benefits of a Pass-Through Product?

AJ: So besides budget stability, how does a pass-through cap and trans product benefit the clients who choose to use it?

Calvin: Well one of the benefits of passing through those demand-based charges is that they potentially can go down over time. If you improve your efficiency by doing a lighting project or some other way that reduces your peak load, then in the following year you’ll see a lower peak load factor. That factor is what is multiplied by your capacity rate. So you can reduce those costs over time by improving your efficiency.

What are the Drawbacks?

AJ: Are there any drawbacks to this product type?

Calvin: Well, the flip side of that coin is if your efficiency were to decrease over time. There is the potential for your capacity rate to go up. And as we mentioned, rates are fluctuating less for capacity and transmission, but they do change on an annual basis. So there’s a different rate each year.

Historically, especially in the ComEd market for example, those rates are known up to 3 years in advance, so we do still have a lot of stability there. But that is something that can change over time, so you could possibly see a different rate every year.

Who’s a Good Fit for a Pass-Through Product?

AJ: Finally, is there any customer type that you would recommend a pass-through cap and trans product to more over another type?

Calvin: I’d have to say that customers with a very predictable load, like a residential building or an office building, are good clients to pass those charges through. Additionally, clients looking for a high level of budget stability like schools who want their costs to not fluctuate as much as possible and be able to predict those costs. I think those are the best clients for this product.

A manufacturing facility or someone that has a lot of variation in their usage may have changing peak loads and may require a little more attention. They may actually want to pass through even more components to give themselves more flexibility to match up with their needs.

 

AJ: Gotcha. Well thank you very much, Calvin, for all of the great information! And thank you to all of you for tuning in to our Two-Minute Tuesday today. If you have any questions about pass-through products or any other product types, feel free to reach out to us and let us know. And if you found this video helpful, please like, comment, or share below.

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Wall Street and Natural Gas

By Michael DeCaluwe, CEM

This winter, natural gas rates have continued their fall below the $2 per dekatherm price point. Weather and decreased production typically create a floor to gas prices. However, neither has been able to slow our run to historically low gas prices.

What’s Wall Street’s role in the market?

Typically, Wall Street’s venture capital firms invest in a company and assume an eventual payout.

  • For example, think of Amazon, which lost money for many years even while its stock price went up. Wall Street was investing in the potential of the company to eventually make money.

Investors applied the “loss leader” strategy to the energy sector, but they haven’t seen the same results. Venture capital firms invested heavily in shale during the post-2008 boom. Yet natural gas rates have continued to decrease, and so have the returns from energy companies.

Debt-riddled and highly leveraged, many natural gas producers have been unable to produce a return for investors.

How did Wall Street get it wrong?

The biggest aspect of the natural gas market that investors didn’t consider is the decline rate in production at the well head.

Gas Well Decline Rates

A decline rate is the decrease in the amount of gas a well is expected to produce year over year. For instance the amount of gas that a shale gas well produces declines by an average of 70 percent in Year 2 versus Year 1.

Natural Gas Decline Rate

Production and Royalty Declines in a Natural Gas Well Over Time — Source: geology.com

The chart above illustrates why the loss leader approach to investing in the natural gas industry has led to big losses.

If these wells aren’t making money in Year 1, the rate of decline means they surely won’t be profitable in future years.

Producers have had to drill new wells to keep production and cash flow up to repay their creditors. This, coupled with the lower domestic gas demand, has created a vicious cycle that has resulted in today’s sub-$.20 gas pricing.

What happens now?

The party might be over for the natural gas industry.

Investors are starting to pull their money out of energy companies, and natural gas rates are at 20-year lows. Shale producers decreased spending by six percent in 2019 and are forecasted to decrease by another 14 percent in 2020.

The number of natural gas-directed wells also decreased by over 35 percent in 2019.

In spite of this decrease in investment and rig counts, gas rates have continued to fall in 2020. It could take a year (or more) of decreased investment in the market to affect natural gas supply.

How This Impacts You

As a buyer, it’s important to understand Wall Street as a market factor. Here are some articles that explain this concept in more detail:

If you’d like to learn about other macro factors affecting the markets, check out our February Chronicles of Nania or feel free to contact me.

 

About the Author

Michael has served as the Senior VP of Commercial & Industrial Sales at Nania Energy Advisors since 2007. He believes that listening to and understanding clients’ energy needs is vital to becoming a thought leader in the industry and forming a mutually beneficial business relationship. In his spare time, Michael enjoys being a dad, staying active, and playing basketball.

Michael can be reached at mdecaluwe@naniaenergy.com or via phone at (630) 225-4552.

TMT: Benefits of a Reverse Auction

Video Transcript

What’s the difference in electricity and natural gas supplied to you between one supplier or another?

The answer? None. They’re both commodities. There’s absolutely no qualitative difference if your supplier is Constellation, Direct Energy, or any of the other dozens of retail energy suppliers.

So, what does matter? Making sure that you’re getting the best effort from all qualified suppliers to provide your organization with the best results.

In this week’s Two-Minute Tuesday, we’re going to talk about how a reverse auction for energy procurement can compress supplier margin and drive energy savings for you.

How does a reverse auction work?

In a reverse auction, all qualified energy suppliers are invited to compete against each other in a live event that you can watch through an online portal.

With each bid, suppliers attempt to win your business by under-bidding one another. They can’t see who the lowest supplier is, but they can see the price to beat. This gives each supplier “last look” and dramatically improves the level of competition.

What happens when the auction ends?

At the conclusion of the auction, when no supplier is willing to go any lower, you’re left with the supplier who was willing to put their money where their mouth is. And the lowest possible energy rates achievable.

You’ll also have a report with time and date stamped bids from all suppliers during the auction.

Consider using a reverse auction for your procurement.

For commodity procurement, there is no more efficient and transparent platform than the reverse auction. But it’s important to note that the auction is just one tool in your energy management toolbox. You aren’t guaranteed the best results just by virtue of using one.

Your consultant or broker should also be:

  • Helping you develop an RFP that defines your energy goals and assists you in making the best decision
  • Monitoring the market for you to advise on the timing of your purchase, and
  • Partnering with you directly to meet the reporting needs of your organization.

When you’re considering options for your upcoming commodity agreement, check out a reverse auction. It might provide some valuable competition you might be missing from your process.

Thanks for watching! If you found this video helpful, please like, comment, or share below.

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TMT: Liquefied Natural Gas

Video Transcript

Did you know that natural gas can be turned into a liquid?

In today’s Two-Minute Tuesday, we’ll be talking about why liquefied natural gas (or LNG) is an important factor in the cost of energy in the US.

Liquefied Natural Gas: Fast Facts

Liquefied natural gas, or LNG, can be exported on ships.

At export terminals, natural gas is cooled to about -260 degrees Fahrenheit, at which point it becomes a liquid. It’s then shipped using special ocean tankers to import terminals. There, LNG is heated and returned to its gaseous state.

Historically, the United Stated imported LNG, so most of our ports are designed to heat LNG to turn it into a gas.

However, recently we’ve seen a rise in shale fracking and an increase in our natural gas production. This led to the opening of the first US LNG export facility in February 2016.

Since then, we’ve added five more export facilities, with more scheduled to come online in the coming years.

Why is Liquefied Natural Gas important?

LNG can affect the price of natural gas both domestically and internationally.

Historically, the price for gas in Europe and Asia has been 80-100% above the cost of gas in the US. This matters because of how it impacts our supply market.

Domestic natural gas producers can get a higher return for their natural gas in the international market versus the US market.

Although we only export a small amount of LNG right now, our exporting capacity could increase because gas producers are driven to capitalize on the market differences. Could this siphoning of supply cause the cost of gas in the US to rise to the level of the international market?

The Future of LNG

The future of LNG exports has a lot riding on the upcoming election. Depending on who wins this contest, the US LNG market could continue to expand or could be cut back. Regardless of the election, LNG exports will continue to influence domestic energy prices for both natural gas and electricity, and its expansion is a factor to watch over the next decade.

Thanks for watching this Two-Minute Tuesday, and look forward to future videos! If you found this video helpful, please like, comment or share below.

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TMT: Demand Response Program for Schools

Video Transcript

Starting June 1st of 2020, significant changes to the Demand Response program in our region could mean a drastic reduction in your school’s payout.

In this week’s Two-Minute Tuesday, we’ll talk about these changes and what they mean for your school district.

What is Demand Response?

Let’s start with a quick recap of Demand Response.

On days when our power demand is at its highest, relative to the “capacity” available to handle that demand, our grid — also known as PJM — has to ensure that everyone who needs power has it. This prevents blackouts.

Rather than installing expensive infrastructure that may only be used a few hours a year to meet that high demand, PJM started a program known as Demand Response.

In the Demand Response program, participants can voluntarily commit to reducing their power load during times that require it.

The only caveat is that participants have to prove that they can hit those levels during an annual 1-hour test event. In return, those participants receive money from PJM for both the test event and any emergency events, should they occur.

What’s new this year?

Historically, these real emergency events only posed a threat in the summer on the hottest days of the year.

Given recent history, however, the winter now also poses a threat in bouts of extremely low temperatures. So how has the Demand Response program changed?

Well, starting June 1st of 2020, the program will require year-round enrollments versus summer only of previous programs. Your total curtailment amount as a school district is now based off the lower of your two PLCs — both winter and summer.

Unless you use electric heat, this means your total curtailment is likely going to decrease dramatically — and so is your money earning potential.

Some curtailment service providers have adapted their software to accommodate these changes and may be able to offer you a unique solution to still enroll for summer only. But keep in mind: your total payout will likely be half of what it was in the past.

Ask your provider how this will impact you.

If your current provider has not yet contacted you about these changes, reach out and ask them how it’s going to impact your revenue potential.

And, if you have questions about how you can still capture some of the earnings — versus dropping out of the program altogether — reach out to us. We’re happy to help!

Thanks so much for watching. If you found this video helpful, please like, comment, or share below.

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PJM Capacity Market Ruling

By Michael DeCaluwe

On Thursday, Dec. 19, 2019, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) voted 2-1 to extend PJM’s Minimum Offer Price Rule (MOPR) to any generation assets that receive state subsidies. As a result, energy consumers in PJM’s territory could see a significant rise in their electric rates.

That’s a lot of energy industry jargon, but we’re going to simplify it here and explain how this new rule could impact you.

What is Capacity?

Capacity is a charge levied by a grid operator, such as PJM. It is money collected from electricity consumers by the grid and paid to power generators to ensure that there’s enough power to meet energy needs during peak demand times.

This charge used to be a small portion of your energy costs, but over the past few years it’s grown to be 25-30% of your energy bill due to coal generators shutting down.  There’s less supply to meet demand.

PJM operates their capacity charges in a 3-year forward market. They hold an auction in which generators bid against each other to set capacity rates 3 years in advance. For example, capacity rates for 2022 were to be set in this year’s auction (2019).

Current State of PJM Capacity Market

Some generators have voiced their concern that state subsidies for some types of generation (such as renewable energy programs, state nuclear bailouts, etc.) place them at an unfair advantage when they need to compete in the capacity auction against these subsidized generators.

FERC — the regulatory body that oversees PJM and other grid operators — agreed to review PJM’s auction rules and delay the 2019 auction while these rules were reviewed.

What did they decide?

In their vote yesterday, FERC essentially banned any subsidized generator from participating in PJM’s capacity auction. This was a victory for un-subsidized generators (coal and natural gas-powered generators), but it was a severe blow to nuclear and renewable generators in PJM’s territory.

PJM Capacity Market

Source: trane.com

Estimates on increased electricity (capacity) costs to consumers range from $1.6 billion – $5.7 billion in the 11 states that PJM serves.

 

Why will capacity costs increase?

All 11 states in PJM’s territory operate some type of subsidization of energy, whether through nuclear bailouts (Illinois or New Jersey) or through state renewable standards (almost all states). If subsidized generators are barred from participating in the capacity market, future capacity markets will be determined by relative few players.

Less Supply + Same Demand = Higher Rates!

Also, without the ability to capitalize on capacity revenue, renewable energy assets become much less economical to build. This stunts the growth of renewable energy in the PJM market.

What’s Next?

There will undoubtedly be court action against this vote. Additionally, some states are pushing for a “carve-out,” in which they would operate their own capacity market independent from PJM.

In short, this FERC ruling has sent the industry into a pandemonium and has created real concern over the future of renewable energy assets in PJM.

What’s there to do as a customer? Nothing at this time until we have a clearer vision of what the final outcome will be. Just be aware that there could be major changes coming to electricity pricing in the next few years.

We’ll keep you updated as we learn more. Please feel free to contact us with any questions.

2020 PJM Demand Response Changes

By Becky Thompson

December 19, 2019

BIG changes to the PJM Demand Response program are coming in 2020.

If you’re currently participating in or considering enrolling in the PJM demand response program, here’s what you need to know.

What is Demand Response?

Demand response is a program designed to ensure reliability of the electric grid during peak demand periods.

Companies that enroll in the program agree to reduce their electric usage when they receive curtailment alerts. In return, they can receive substantial payments from PJM.

“I don’t think we can curtail any usage.”

That’s what clients initially say when we bring up demand response.

There are a variety of ways businesses can curtail their usage without major disruptions to daily operations. For example:

  • Industrial or manufacturing clients can shift production to off-peak hours.
  • Hospitals and data centers can use non-emergency backup generators that meet program requirements.
  • Schools and residential buildings can raise air conditioning set points by 5 degrees and turn off unused lighting.

What’s changing in 2020?

Up until 2019, organizations could enroll in a Base Capacity program that only required participation during summer months (typically June through September). Since most businesses use more power in the summer than the winter, they could easily match their projections and earn big payouts.

Starting in June 2020, the only available demand response program will be PJM Capacity Performance, a mandatory year-round program for participants.

Quick Facts about PJM Capacity Performance

  1. Demand response program participants will be required to curtail their usage during summer and winter events.
  2. Summer season is June 2020 – October 2020 and May 2021. Winter season is November 2020 – April 2021.
  3. There will be two test events  — one in summer and one in winter — and participants will have to participate in at least one of the tests.
  4. The enrollment deadline for the 2020 – 2021 is in the first or second week of May. However, the program has been decreased by 20% for this year – so enrollment space could run out before then. Site that sign up by the end of February should be able to get their desired kW enrollment value.

Why the change?

Blackouts occur when the demand for power exceeds the amount of supply available. And in recent years, winter blackouts have become more likely than summer because there is lower total supply available. In the Polar Vortex of 2014, PJM energy consumers were at risk of experiencing a blackout during one of the coldest winters in history.

As a result, PJM was forced to rethink how they viewed grid reliability.

How You Can Prepare Yourself for PJM Capacity Performance

Here are a few things to keep in mind when considering enrolling in the new program:

  • The minimum requirement for curtailment is 100 kW.
  • Your curtailment ability will be the difference between your seasonal Peak Load Contribution (PLC) and your Firm Service Level (FSL). Since these can vary greatly between summer and winter, you may see a drastic reduction in your curtailment ability and potential payout.
  • To maximize your payout, ask your demand response vendor if they offer a seasonal performance program that allows you to have different curtailment values for summer and winter.
  • Enrollment in the demand response program is limited because the total MW allotment has been decreased by 20%. It could be beneficial for you to sign a longer Demand Response agreement to ensure your seat at the table in the future.

Despite the changes coming to the program, demand response could be a viable way for your organization to generate some additional revenue. Contact us to discuss if the program is a good fit for you.

 

About the Author

Becky is a Senior Strategic Energy Advisor specializing in the public sector, including schools and municipalities. She has been in the energy industry for over five years, working from the ground up as an account manager and then as an electric pricing team lead. Her background knowledge of the inner workings or an energy company helps her identify actionable strategies for making her clients’ energy strategies both easy and cost-effective. In her free time, Becky enjoys any activity that requires being outside and making her son belly laugh.

Becky can be reached at (630) 225-4561 or bthompson@naniaenergy.com.

Ask An Advisor: LED Lighting Upgrade

December 16, 2019

Video Transcript

Hi! I’m Michael, the Senior Vice President at Nania Energy Advisors. Now you’ve probably heard that upgrading your facility’s lighting to LEDs is one of the easiest ways to reduce your energy costs and to reduce your carbon footprint.

And that’s true. But what does it look and feel like to do a lighting upgrade project?

In today’s video, you’ll get an inside look at an in-progress LED upgrade, along with some before and after shots. You’ll be amazed by the results. Come see what I mean!

How does a lighting project affect day-to-day activities?

Today we’re on site at one of our industrial clients who is currently undergoing an LED upgrade project. As you can see, the contractor is able to do the lighting project with minimal disruption to manufacturing activities.

What can you expect from a lighting upgrade project?

So after the lights have been replaced and the project is complete, what can you expect to see?

1) Energy Savings

Depending on the energy of your current system, you should expect energy costs and usage related to lighting to drop anywhere from 20-80%.

As an added bonus, those organizations with sustainability goals should also see a reduction in in their carbon footprint, improving LEED scores and Energy STAR ratings.

2) Quick Return on Investment (ROI)

The average LED project will have a payback period of 1-3 years.

  • A payback period is defined as the amount of time that it would take for your electricity savings to accumulate to equal the initial project cost.

Your individual payback period will depend on a few factors, most notably:

  • The efficiency of your current system,
  • The number of hours that your lights are on during an average week, and
  • Any utility rebates that are provided to help pay for the initial project cost.

3) Lower Maintenance Costs

While a typical fluorescent bulb will last between 20,000 and 30,000 working hours (or 2-3 years), you can expect an LED bulb to last over 100,000 working hours (or 10 years).

Because LEDs last longer, you won’t have to replace them as often, saving you money on labor and supplies related to lighting.

Before

After

What are the benefits of a LED lighting upgrade?

So how is this industrial client benefiting from their lighting project?

  • This client will see an annual savings of over $31,000 a year on their electricity costs.
  • They’ll see a project payback of 2.6 years.
  • And they will see the lighting quality in their facility improve by over 250%.

How can you pay for a LED lighting upgrade?

Now, if you’re worried about how to pay for a lighting project, the good news is that you don’t have to pay for it all up front. There are many creative ways to pay for an LED upgrade.

For example, this customer selected to use on-bill financing. This project is being funded by one of our electricity supply partners, and the client is paying for the project through a small fee on their monthly electricity invoice.

Consider doing a lighting project at your facility.

As you can see, a lighting project can be extremely beneficial to your facility. If you’d like to learn more about LED upgrades or other efficiency projects, please check out our website or contact us.

Thank you for watching, and look for future energy videos.

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Two-Minute Tuesday: Reverse Auction for Energy

December 10, 2019

Video Transcript

love buying things on eBay. It’s that thrill of the auction as those last seconds tick down and getting the product that I really wanted at a great price.

What if I told you that you can buy your gas and electricity commodity in an auction format as well? But instead of the price going higher like it does on eBay, the price goes down. It’s what we call a reverse auction. 

In this week’s Two-Minute Tuesday, we’re going to talk about what a reverse auction is for energy buying, if you’re a good fit, and what the benefits could be to your business as a result.

What is a reverse auction?

So what is a reverse auction? Just like we talked about, it’s like eBay in reverse. Instead of the price going higher for your electric or natural gas price, the price is actually going down as more bidders compete.

Take your current supplier or third party, like a Constellation or a Direct Energy. They all compete in an open platform online live for 20-30 minutes submitting multiple bids to win your business.

What are the benefits of a reverse auction?

The benefits to you are transparency in the process and a lower overall energy rate.

Am I a good fit for a reverse auction?

To find out if you’re a good fit for this, you may consider:

  • Do you need complete transparency in your purchasing or procurement process?
  • Are you a public entity where you want to see everything on a fair, open platform?
  • Or, are you a large business where energy is a large spend for you and you need the absolute lowest rate possible in the marketplace?

If so, this may be a route you want to consider.

So how about a real-life example?

We just ran a reverse auction for electricity for a large local school district a few months ago. Their overall rate at the end of the auction resulted in savings of $600,000 for their school district.

Think about how that kind of money and savings could help your operating budget. Then, reach out to your current broker or consultant and see if this is something that they offer. See what it could look like for your business and the savings you could attain as a result.

Thanks for watching our video! Leave your comments below, and check out this article on how you could benefit from a reverse auction.