TMT: Energy Challenges for Manufacturers

Video Transcript

Hi everyone, and welcome back to another Nania Energy Advisors’ Two-Minute Tuesday. I’m AJ Brockman, Nania’s Content Marketing Manager. Today we will be talking with Senior Energy Advisor and Mid-Atlantic Manager Mike Eckenroth about the specific challenges that manufacturers face when it comes to energy. So let’s get started!

Energy Challenges for Manufacturers

AJ: So Mike, when it comes to energy, what would you say are the top two to three challenges manufacturers typically face?

Mike E: Good question! I would say number one is probably how to reduce and control energy costs.

Manufacturing is typically an energy-intensive process. You’re taking a number of raw materials, putting them through your process, and converting them into what you want to make. And throughout that process, there’s a lot of energy consumed. So the concern is about how to reduce and control those costs to keep operational costs low.

Secondly, manufacturers want efficiency and confidence in their energy procurement, which isn’t always easy to have. There’s a lot of different choices available — brokers, advisors, consultants, suppliers and products — to choose from. Figuring out a process to determine which method to use for procurement is definitely a challenge.

Tips for Reducing Costs

AJ: And when you talk to manufacturers or decision makers in manufacturing, what sorts of tips or solutions to those challenges are they typically looking for?

ME: So to answer the second point, we did a broker versus advisor video a few months ago, so I recommend they check that out. But, really, it’s about finding an advisor or consultant that you trust and that sits on your side of the table.

You want them negotiating with suppliers on your behalf to achieve your goals. So you should feel that all of those things are being met by them, and I’d recommend interviewing a few different ones to get a feel of who has your best interests in mind and who you have the most confidence in.

Secondly, they’re looking to identify opportunities that they might not have seen otherwise. The number one way to do this is with an energy audit.

You have various operations that you’re doing day in and day out, and you might not realize there are opportunities in front of you for that. This could be things like LEDs or HVAC controls, variable frequency drives, water controls. An energy audit will identify those opportunities, and then we can prioritize those according to your ROI goals. So this is really about making you more efficient, doing more of the same output with less energy input, reducing those costs from that side.

Along that same vein is demand response. Demand response is a voluntary curtailment program during emergencies. So for a few hours of participation a year, a manufacturer could earn tens of thousands of dollars in payment for those.

This is particularly important for manufacturers because they usually have some control over when their energy is being consumed. They can schedule activities at different times and things like that, and so it’s typically a program that works really well for them.

And lastly is tax exemptions. This has been huge for manufacturers that we work with. Nania Energy is not a tax firm, we are not licensed tax professionals that can provide advice on taxes.

However, we’re aware of some exemptions that exist, and we can double check your bills for those. So if you are paying taxes and you shouldn’t be, that’s something we’ll be able to take a look at and either recommend you to one of our partnered tax firms or have you investigate it and recover that money (up to 48 months in some states) as well as remove that cost going forward. So that’s really low-hanging fruit that’s available for manufacturers.

Sustainable Manufacturing

AJ: Great tips, Mike. Lastly, I want to talk about green energy. Sustainability is starting to become more of a factor for both producers and consumers. What advice would you give to manufacturers who are interested in going green?

ME: So what we talked about with energy audits: even though it may or may not seem like that’s the easiest way to go green, it probably is one of the easiest. There’s a lot of wasted energy in a lot of different processes that manufacturers use, and there are ways to recover that. There are ROIs that are increasingly lower and lower to match those 2 and 3 year goals that some organizations have for that. So that would be number one: looking for those efficiency opportunities.

Number two is sourcing your energy with green power. Typically, energy supply agreements are going to be maybe 10 percent renewable, depending on your state or municipality. And there are opportunities for you to source 100 percent of your energy from renewable sources.

You do pay a little bit of a premium for it, but you’re talking about one to two percent, so it’s very manageable if green energy is a corporate initiative or an initiative for your organization. That’s definitely a way to achieve that.

And thirdly is on-site generation. This is typically a little less popular, mostly because you have to have the floor space or the space to dedicate to it. There are requirements, such as how long you’re going to be in the building, lease obligations, and ROI constraints that you have to sort through.

On-site generation is going to have longer ROI, but if you have the square footage or roof space to allocate to solar and you have a longer term that you’re willing to accept the ROI for, that’s absolutely something you should be looking into and could provide some of the results you’re looking for.

 

AJ: Great! Well thanks so much, Mike, for all of that great information. And thank you to everyone for watching our video! If you’re in manufacturing or you’re a decision maker for a manufacturing facility, tune in to our webinar on June 25th. We will be presenting some energy tips that are specific to you.

Thanks again for watching! If you found this video helpful, please like, comment, or share below.

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